Bluebonnet Seeds Are Available!

AgriLife Logo

Sharing information from the Upper Sabine Soil and Water Conservation District: Bluebonnet Seeds are on sale now with Upper Sabine Soil and Water Conservation District! The Upper Sabine Soil & Water Conservation District is happy to once again make bluebonnet seed available to the public for purchase so that everyone can enjoy these beautiful flowers, next spring. Upper Sabine Soil and Water Conservation District will be selling seed until October 31. The Upper Sabine Soil and Water Conservation District will offer 1 pound and ½ pounds bags. The… Read More →

Compost vs Mulch

AgriLife Logo

Compost vs Mulch by Wayne Bowman, Master Gardener. Not all mulch is compost, but all compost can be used as mulch. To be clear, the terms are not interchangeable. Unlike compost, some forms of mulch will never decompose– such as shredded rubber tires. Various woods are slow to decompose– like cypress or redwood. This doesn’t mean they are bad mulch products– they still keep the soil moist and at a lower temperature– but they’ll not turn into quickly useable compost. Another way to distinguish between the two is… Read More →

Making Garden Decor

AgriLife Logo

Making Garden Decor by June Morgan, Master Gardener. A beautifully planted garden often has whimsical, useful, or comforting additions to grace its landscape.  Unfortunately, many store-bought items, especially those made of concrete, are very expensive.  The do-it-yourselfer does not have to be an artist in order to make striking sculptural decor out of concrete. Hundreds of different shapes can be made with this medium, such as spheres and leaves of all sizes which can be used for projects such as fountains, stepping stones, and wire sculptures. Molds for… Read More →

Fall Vegetable Gardening

AgriLife Logo

Fall Vegetable Gardening by Karla Basallaje, Master Gardener. As we approach fall with its mellow days, cooler nighttime temperatures, and pretty autumn colors of red and gold, our thoughts turn to our fall garden. Even as we are still enduring hot rainless days, it is the perfect time to plan and to plant. The fall vegetable garden offers a great opportunity to repeat successful spring and early summer plantings or to re-try an attempted but failed crop. We learn by our mistakes! So whether we need to change… Read More →

Fall Tomatoes – Part 2

AgriLife Logo

Fall Tomatoes – Part 2 by Byron Chitwood, Master Gardener. You can still make a fall crop of tomatoes in your garden. For best results, they should be planted in July. Depending on variety, they take 60 to 90 days to produce. Start garden plants from transplants that you purchase through your favorite nursery if available. Start indoors with seeds or cuttings from some of your favorite spring tomatoes. After planting in the garden, protect them from direct sun by shading with shingles or cardboard. Keep the ground… Read More →

Rainwater Harvesting

AgriLife Logo

Rainwater Harvesting by Wayne Bowman, Master Gardener. The collection of rainwater, or rainwater harvesting as it’s termed nowadays, has been around for centuries. Archeological digs have documented the building of cisterns for more than 10,000 years. All water is rainwater. Rain falls from the clouds and runs into creeks and rivers, where municipalities use the water for drinking or sanitary purposes and then return it to streams. Streams flow into lakes and oceans where it evaporates and again forms clouds and rain to complete the cycle. I’ve read… Read More →

Fall Tomatoes

AgriLife Logo

Fall Tomatoes by Byron Chitwood, Master Gardener. It might sound like it is too early to plant fall tomatoes, especially when the ones that were planted in the spring are at the height of their production. However, if fall tomatoes are expected to mature before the frost gets them, they should be planted now or very soon. Unfortunately, not many transplants are available this time of the year, but if you are lucky enough to find some, buy and plant them as soon as possible. They will require… Read More →

Monarch Butterflies

AgriLife Logo

Monarch Butterflies by Byron Chitwood, Master Gardener. Monarch Butterflies reach our area in early to mid spring.  Surprisingly some of these butterflies overwintered in the Mariposa Monarca Biosphere in Mexico. Some of the later spring migration that you witness may be the offspring of earlier ones that migrated from Mexico and reproduced along the way.  There are several other mass migrations of Monarchs, some of which are the ones west of the Rockies and others that overwinter in Florida.  The ones that we see and are interested in… Read More →

Turfgrass

AgriLife Logo

Turfgrass by Karla Basallaje, Master Gardener. Because it serves so many purposes and provides many benefits, it is easy to forget that turfgrass is likely the largest plant in your garden. Not only does it provide your home with curb-appeal, it controls soil erosion and runoff; it limits dust and noise, as well as helping to dissipate heat. As with other plants in your garden, they need care; more specifically, your lawn needs to be mowed, watered and fed. Ideally, it would make sense to start with a… Read More →

Fire Ants

AgriLife Logo

Fire Ants by Byron Chitwood, Master Gardener. It’s that time of the year when you begin to notice that you have fire ants in your yard or pasture. Actually, they have been there all through the winter. They just set up housekeeping deeper underground to avoid the cold. Now that the temperature has warmed up, they have moved closer to the surface of the ground, especially after a rain. As the water level rises after a rain, fire ants will build a fluffy mound above the surface of… Read More →