Hanging Baskets

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Hanging Baskets by June Morgan, Master Gardener. Hanging baskets can add much to the outdoor porch and deck summer decor, but it can be a challenge to keep them looking their best. Proper siting, basket design and proper watering are key elements of good management. The best setting is a protected area which allows sunlight from above or the sides such as a deck canopy out of the strong winds which will tear the plants apart.  In contrast to the ordinary solid plastic container, the larger mesh basket… Read More →

Summer Vegetable Gardening

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Summer Vegetable Gardening by Karla Basallaje, Master Gardener. Hot Texas summers do not necessarily signal the end of our time in the garden.  There are a variety of vegetables that can be sown from April through early May for harvest in the summer.  In addition, some of these vegetables can be planted on a staggered schedule to reap a continuous harvest throughout the summer.   The goal is to keep your garden growing and producing fresh harvests.  Planting different varieties of the same vegetable can also help make the… Read More →

Raised Bed Gardening

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Raised Bed Gardening by Wayne Bowman,  Master Gardener. Spring; time to look ahead to planting, growing, and eating our own fresh vegetables.  So, you thought you’d try your hand at raised beds, since you don’t have loads of space.  Great!  First, though, you’ll need to build it, and planning is the key. When planning your raised beds, placement, materials, size, and use must all be considered. Placement:  Just about any nearly flat surface is good.  For many, however, there’s another consideration; the Home Owner Association.  If you live… Read More →

The Aggie Method of Leaf Propagation – and This is No Joke

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“The Aggie Method of Leaf Propagation – and This is No Joke” by Master Gardener Sylvia Leeds as published in African Violet Magazine March – April 2018.

March Vegetable Gardening

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March Vegetable Gardening by Byron Chitwood, Master Gardener. If you planted tomatoes, peppers and potatoes before the 14th of March, chances are that the vegetables suffered some frost damage.  I visited with a large nursery in Frisco yesterday and they said that people got in a hurry to plant these sorts of things because of the mild weather we were having.  I did have some tomato plants planted but they were in large pots and I have been putting in our warm garage overnight.  However, my potatoes were… Read More →

Asparagus 2

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Asparagus 2 by Byron Chitwood, Master Gardener. If you would like to plan an Asparagus bed, now is the time to get started.  This article will discuss a limited size bed which should eventually produce enough for a family of four by the third year after planting.  The site for this new bed should have full sunshine or as much during the day as possible.  It should be in a well drained area and have access to a water supply.  Wild creatures such as rabbits and squirrels don’t… Read More →

Plants for Valentines

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Plants for Valentines by June Morgan, Master Gardener. Poinsettias for Christmas, lilies for Easter and red roses for Valentine are traditional flowers for gift giving. The first two are usually potted plants, and with the right care can give pleasure for a long time. Alas, it is not true for the beautiful long stemmed roses which are not only expensive but wilt within a short time. With proper care, potted plants with long lasting blooms and dish gardens can be welcome and practical alternatives. Despite having a finicky reputation,… Read More →

Bare Rooted Fruit Trees

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Bare Rooted Fruit Trees by Wanda Loras, Master Gardener. There is nothing better than a firm, juicy peach or a crisp apple plucked from your very own tree.  If this sounds good to you, start now and in a couple of years it can happen. Bare rooted fruit trees are available in the garden centers now.  They come packed with damp moss or sawdust covered with material to keep the roots moist.  They are less expensive and if planted properly are just as successful as container plants.  Plant… Read More →

Poisonous Holiday Plants

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Poisonous Holiday Plants by June Morgan, Master Gardener.  If you have been following the columns by Master Gardeners, you are well aware of the main  toxic plants such as poison oak and ivy found in the summer. But decorative  winter plants also have their dangers, especially those prevalent during the holidays which can pose special threats to our pets and children. Poinsettias have a reputation for being poisonous, but it would be unlikely for a pet or child to ingest enough of the leaves to be really dangerous… Read More →

Conditioning Your Garden in Winter

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Conditioning Your Garden in Winter by Stephanie Suesan Smith, PhD, Master Gardener. Although most people do not grow vegetables over the winter, you can still work to make your garden the best it can be next spring.  First, remove all of the old, dead plant material.  If the plants were healthy and died of heat or frost, compost them.  If they had diseases or severe pest problems, it is best to throw the plants into a bag, seal the bag, and throw them in the trash.  If you… Read More →