Asparagus 2

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Asparagus 2 by Byron Chitwood, Hunt County Master Gardener.   If you would like to plan an Asparagus bed, now is the time to get started.  This article will discuss a limited size bed which should eventually produce enough for a family of four by the third year after planting.  The site for this new bed should have full sunshine or as much during the day as possible.  It should be in a well drained area and have access to a water supply.  Wild creatures such as rabbits… Read More →

Plants for Valentines

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Plants for Valentines by June Morgan, Hunt County Master Gardener. Poinsettias for Christmas, lilies for Easter and red roses for Valentine are traditional flowers for gift giving. The first two are usually potted plants, and with the right care can give pleasure for a long time. Alas, it is not true for the beautiful long stemmed roses which are not only expensive but wilt within a short time. With proper care, potted plants with long lasting blooms and dish gardens can be welcome and practical alternatives. Despite having a… Read More →

Bare Rooted Fruit Trees

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Bare Rooted Fruit Trees by Wanda Loras, Hunt County Master Gardener. There is nothing better than a firm, juicy peach or a crisp apple plucked from your very own tree.  If this sounds good to you, start now and in a couple of years it can happen. Bare rooted fruit trees are available in the garden centers now.  They come packed with damp moss or sawdust covered with material to keep the roots moist.  They are less expensive and if planted properly are just as successful as container… Read More →

Poisonous Holiday Plants

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Poisonous Holiday Plants by June Morgan, Master Gardener.  If you have been following the columns by Master Gardeners, you are well aware of the main  toxic plants such as poison oak and ivy found in the summer. But decorative  winter plants also have their dangers, especially those prevalent during the holidays which can pose special threats to our pets and children. Poinsettias have a reputation for being poisonous, but it would be unlikely for a pet or child to ingest enough of the leaves to be really dangerous… Read More →

Conditioning Your Garden in Winter

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Conditioning Your Garden in Winter by Stephanie Suesan Smith, PhD, Master Gardener. Although most people do not grow vegetables over the winter, you can still work to make your garden the best it can be next spring.  First, remove all of the old, dead plant material.  If the plants were healthy and died of heat or frost, compost them.  If they had diseases or severe pest problems, it is best to throw the plants into a bag, seal the bag, and throw them in the trash.  If you… Read More →

Christmas Cactus

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Christmas Cactus by Stephanie Suesan Smith, Ph.D., Master Gardener. Christmas cactus has segmented stems that are flat and have spines along the edge of the sections.  Most of the year, it is just a slightly odd green plant.  However, when it blooms the blooms are beautiful and unusual, and more than make up for the wall flower appearance of the stems. The Christmas cactus is native to the South American rain forests.  This means that it expects a rather high degree of humidity.  It would be impractical to… Read More →

Hunt County Master Gardeners 2018 TOUR OF GARDENS

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Late Fall Vegetables

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LATE FALL VEGETABLES – Byron Chitwood After our hot summers, we are all looking forward for a change to a cool fall.  With this cooler weather coming on, now is the time to plan for late fall vegetables in our garden plots.  The first ones that come to mind are turnips and beets.  Both of these vegetables are prized for both their greens and roots.  Both can be planted from mid- August through the end of September.  After cleanup of the spaces allocated for the two vegetables, till… Read More →

Art Of Gardening Talk July 16, 2015

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The Art of Gardening talk is coming up on July 16, 2015 at 6 pm.  See the flyer below for all the details.

Fall Tomatoes

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Fall Tomatoes by Byron Chitwood. It might sound like it is too early to plant fall tomatoes, especially when the ones that were planted in the spring are at the height of their production.  However, if fall tomatoes are expected to mature before the frost gets them, they should be planted now or very soon.  Unfortunately, not many transplants are available this time of the year, but if you are lucky enough to find some, buy and plant them as soon as possible. They will require more care… Read More →