Tag Archives: Squash Bugs,

Squash Bugs

Squash Bugs by Stephanie Suesan Smith, Ph.D. Squash bugs are some of the most frustrating pests in the home garden.  They feast on a wide array of plants in the curcubit family and can do some pretty serious damage to them.  They pierce the plants and suck out the sap, causing the plants to wilt or even die.  They are also hard to kill.  They can be controlled, though, with a little effort. To control squash bugs, it helps to understand their life cycle.  Adult squash bugs are… Read More →

Squash Bugs

If you have cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, or melons, you have likely encountered squash bugs on your plants.  These flat, large insects are about 5/8 inch long and 1/3 inch wide.  They are usually dark brown to dark gray and have a diamond shaped shield on their shoulders.  Their abdomens protrude and are typically orange and brown striped. The eggs of the squash bug are oval, small, and yellowish to bronze.  The nymphs, or babies, go through five stages of growth, or instars, and are green when born.  They… Read More →

Squash Bugs

Squash Bugs by PJ LaRue Smith A Texas vegetable garden usually contains several types of cucurbits – cucumber, squash/zucchini, cantaloupe, watermelon, pumpkin, and assorted gourds to name but a few.  Often-heard amongst gardeners in late spring/early summer is frustration over the “sudden” death that has befallen their squash plants.  In a row of plants, one will die, seemingly overnight, while the rest will carry on for a week or so before another suffers the same fate. Many gardeners just attribute this to the hotter, drier weather, lack of… Read More →